agile teams

In my recent post, problems with Scaled Agile, I discussed SAFe and the Agile mindset.

Aside from debating the value in SAFe, the post created good dialogue about how to foster an Agile mindset within teams. That is, how to help teams become more collaborative, open and trusting.

In my experience, teams often struggle adopting an Agile mindset for two obvious, yet overlooked reasons.

Reason 1 – The team consists of people who don’t like Agile

Think this sounds silly? I can’t tell you how many “Agile” teams I have worked with that had team members who wanted nothing to do with Agile. Not only were they not drinking the Agile Kool-Aid, they were down right opposed to it.

Management makes a big mistake when the put people who aren’t on board with Agile on Agile teams. The thinking is that team members will come around and learn to embrace Agile values. Of course, this doesn’t happen.

John Kotter, Harvard leadership professor, gives great advice on dealing with change resistors. His message is to not try to include them in the change effort. This means, go around them or get rid of them. This may sound harsh, but trying to include anti Agile people in Agile teams causes too much damage.

Managers – When you are forming Agile teams, make sure you bring on people who want to be on an Agile team. The challenge though, is vetting out the Agile imposters.

Reason 2 – People assume roles that do not align with their personality.

The classic example of this is when a traditional project manager takes on the Scrum Master role. A big misconception is that the Scrum Master and Project Manager roles are interchangeable. The truth is the two roles are different. The Scrum master role is about servant leadership. This is different from project management which is more about command and control.

Want to know if a Scrum Master is behaving more like a Project Manager? Attend the team daily scrum and you will find out. If the Scrum Master controls the meeting, they are in project management mode. The daily Scrum is a team meeting, it is not meant for each team member to provide status to the Scrum Master.

Some people who are great Project Managers make lousy Scrum Masters, and vice versa. Make sure you put people into a role that best aligns with their personality and strengths. If you don’t, good luck trying to change someones personality to fit a role.

To recap, if you want an Agile team that embraces Agile values, start by getting the right people on the team. Do not form a team with people who oppose Agile. Next, put people in roles that fit their personality. Do not expect people to change their personality to fit a role.

Like Collins says, get the right people on the bus, and in the right seats!

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