In our current age of digital disruptions and continuous market changes, C-level executives must prepare to achieve greater agility. This is true across all industries and sectors, not only in technology. Enterprise wide flexibility has far reaching advantages, including revenue and profit increase and faster speed to market.

Achieving greater agility is not only about software development and engineering methods. It’s also about culture change, which often is the biggest road block to agility. Changing culture requires commitment from the C-level. In a recent report by PMI and Forbes Insights (Achieving Greater Agility), they surveyed C-level executives across the globe. Only 27 percent of executives surveyed considered themselves highly agile.  “In fact, culture emerges as one of the biggest hurdles to adapting to higher levels of agility, with 50 percent of respondents calling it challenging. In this light, it is troubling that only a quarter of all executives find their cultures to be strong enablers of agility.”

Below are four steps for the C-suite to drive culture change towards greater agility. These are the steps that Walmart and other large companies successfully used:

  1. Start small – For large organizations, start by using a small piecemeal approach. By creating small pockets of cultural change, you will have more success scaling. Structure small teams that are empowered and autonomous. Your odds of transformation success increase even more if you have people who will embrace agile values. Enable them to make decisions, and get out of their way. Most of all let them have fun!
  2. Teach your leaders – Management needs to learn a new way of doing things. Agility is about empowering and coaching teams. Command and control needs to go to the wayside. This is a mindset change for management that is so critical for success. Teach management to let go of control. If they don’t, it will be an absolute killer to agility.
  3. Set expectations – The Company needs to be clear about expectations for a new way of working and expect some attrition. Agile is not for everyone, and it’s best to be up front with people. If anyone wants to move on and not be part of an agile culture, that’s fine. Be clear and set expectations up front.
  4. Invest in training – You have to invest in the training so people can learn how to work in an agile environment. The key is driving out fear so smaller teams feel safe making decisions on their own. Sending people to a two day course is helpful, but not enough. Embed training and learning as part of the culture that is ongoing. Create practice groups and promote learning.

Whether you are a small company or a large enterprise, agility is the key to survival. The C-suite has a responsibility to engage and promote agility. With their efforts, driving culture change can be accomplished.

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an Agile Delivery Consultant and IT Project/Program Manager. Follow Mike on Twitter@MikeMacIsaac or visit Mike’s blog.