“The Only Thing That Is Constant Is Change” – Heraclitus

Change is necessary in business, technology, and in our personal lives. For me, these past couple of months I have had a lot of change in my life. From moving to a new home to starting a new consulting assignment, change has been abundant. While change can be unsettling, it’s necessary for growth. This brings me to latest consulting role, working in Dotcom Operations.

The picture above shows the monitoring screens located across from where I sit. As you can tell, it’s no small deal. Keeping a live production website running which handles thousands of transactions per second is no small ordeal. To do so, while also adding changes and enhancements, requires talented operations teams.

In my view, operations teams don’t get the credit they deserve. The people I’m working with in web operations are some of the most technical folks I’ve worked with. They are also good people. They are infrastructure engineers, coders, and they work with the latest DevOps technology.

It’s fun learning about the latest technology they’re using in Web Operations. Infrastructure built in the cloud using tools like Jenkins, Chef and Splunk has given me a broader perspective on IT. It’s taken me back to my days testing software in QA, but things have changed. The technical systems for web operations are more advanced than they were five years ago.

Technical systems are always challenging to manage, but what’s more challenging, are the human systems. People need to collaborate and communicate with each other, and this is where I come in to help. The effectiveness of operations teams relies heavily on communication.

To help with communication and the constant influx of work coming in, the teams use Kanban. Kanban uses a pull system to make process better. Below is an example of what you may have seen with a Kanban board.

The core practices of Kanban are as follows:

  • Visualize Workflow – Using Kanban, teams can see the whole visual representation of their workflow.
  • Limit WIP (work in progress/process) – Teams should experiment with WIP limits, which will help improve focus and increase throughput.
  • Manage Flow – By paying attention to how quickly work is getting through the process, teams can begin to improve flow management.
  • Make Process Policies Explicit – Teams should set their own policies on how they can best do their work and improve flow.
  • Implement Feedback Loops – This is about continuous improvement. Just like in Scrum, Kanban teams need to measure their effectiveness and continuously improve.
  • Improve Collaboratively, Evolve Experimentally

Kanban comes from manufacturing and the TPS (Toyota Production System). The below quote is from Taiichi Ohno, creator of the TPS:

“There is no magic method. Rather, a total management system is needed that develops human ability to its fullest capacity to best enhance creativity and fruitfulness, to utilize facilities and machines well, and to eliminate all waste.”

Eliminating waste was a major rule of the original TPS. TPS identified seven types of waste in manufacturing. They are Transportation, Waiting, Motion, Defects, Inventory, Overproduction and Extra Processing.

Years later, Mary and Tom Poppendieck defined the following seven categories for waste in software development.

  • Partially done work
  • Extra processes
  • Extra features
  • Task switching
  • Waiting
  • Motion
  • Defects

An effective way of identifying waste for is through creating Value Stream Maps. Often the biggest bottlenecks occur after development and testing are complete.

Summary

Over the past few years I’ve managed a broad range of IT projects. From working in the insurance industry, to reverse logistics programs, to Web Operations. While this work has commonalities, Web Operations is different. Tackling a constant flow of work is a change for me, and change is good. The change to Web Operations has provided me with two key opportunities. The first and most important, is to provide value and help a talented team of engineers. The second is to learn a different aspect of IT and business.

Are you embracing change in your business and in your life? If you work in software development, are you continually trying to reduce waste and follow lean principles?

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an IT Project and Program Manager as well as an Agile Scrum Master. Follow Mike on Twitter@MikeMacIsaac or subscribe to Mike’s blog.