Search results: "project management" Page 2 of 5

5 reasons project managers make lousy scrum masters

Lousy Scrum Masters

As the Agile movement continues to grow, the demand for scrum masters has increased. Traditional project managers have caught on and they’re disguising themselves as scrum masters. With a small fudge of the resume, they’re hired as scrum masters. What’s the problem? Project managers make lousy scrum masters.

Now, don’t freak out and get offended. When I first began working as a srum master, coming from an IT project management and QA background, I was lousy. I had a steep learning curve. It’s only after time and working with good Agile coaches that I’ve been able to improve as a scrum master.

The reason we project managers make lousy scrum masters is simple. The two roles are completely different. The original founders of scrum have made it clear that a scrum master is not a project manager. For a description of the scrum master role, check out the Scrum Guide from Scrum Alliance.

Yet, companies continue to hire project managers as scrum masters. Part of the problem is that most business executives don’t understand Agile. I still hear the question from management, “hey can you do that project using Agile”? As if Agile is something you can decide to use like choosing which fuel to pick at the gas station. Agile is a different way of working and thinking. Agile adoption requires commitment and understanding from teams and leadership.

Okay, I’ll get off my soap box. Without further ado, here’s my list of 5 reasons why project managers make lousy scrum masters:

  1. The concept of self-organizing teams doesn’t register with project managers. This may be the most challenging aspect in Scrum for project managers. Project managers are hardwired to tell teams what to do and when to do it. They then expect a full status back in return. In Scrum, the team decides what to work on with guidance from the product owner. The team is then accountable to each other, not to the scrum master. During the daily Scrum, team members should be giving their updates to the team, not to the scrum master. Keeping quiet and letting the team be accountable makes project managers feel like fish out of water.
  1. Project Managers aren’t used to coaching. On traditional projects the project manager is a leader and decision maker. In Scrum, one of the primary roles of the scrum master is to coach the team. They coach in self-organization and cross-functionality. To be able to coach though, one first needs to learn. If the project manager hasn’t learned Scrum, how could they coach the team?
  1. Project Managers struggle to give up being the top dog. On traditional projects, the project manager is the top dog. The buck stops with them. As a project manager, it feels good to have authority and control. In Scrum, you have to let that go. The scrum master does not have authority. The team does not report to the scrum master. The one who has authority on the Scrum team is the product owner. This fact requires project manager to have humility when transitioning to Scrum.
  1. Project managers freak out without a plan. The Project Management Institute teaches project managers to create plans, for everything. If you have your PMP, you know that they expect you to create a giant plan (document) consisting of like 10 sub plans. This plan, the size of the PMBOK, does not change unless there’s some official change request. While Agile still involves planning, this is completely different from Scrum.
  1. Most project managers don’t understand servant leadership. Scrum masters are servant leaders. This means they’re willing to jump in and do whatever it takes to remove impediments and help the team. That might mean helping to dive in and handle low level administrative work. Scrum masters put their ego aside and serve the team. Instead of puffing out their chest and telling everyone what to do, the Scrum Master asks how they can be of service. Most project managers are not used to this style of leadership when they begin in Scrum.

Here’s the good news, it is possible for project managers to become good scrum masters. It takes time and training. It’s like learning to play both guitar and drums well. Yes both instruments create music, but they need different training and skill sets.

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an IT Project and Program Manager as well as an Agile Scrum Master. Follow Mike on Twitter @MikeMacIsaac or subscribe to Mike’s blog.

 

 

 

 

 

The identity crisis of the IT project manager

The IT project manager role is one of the most in demand and sought after positions in technology. Ask any hiring manager and they will tell you that finding a good IT project manager is difficult. I’ve seen people with the most impressive credentials crash and burn trying to manage IT projects.

So what exactly is an IT project manager, and what makes a good one? The IT project manager used to be the person accountable for managing scope, schedule, and budget for IT projects. Today, that’s still true, for the most part, but the role has a bit of an identity crisis

The Project Management Institute, with their PMP certification, says the role is all about planning and control. If you’ve taken the PMP exam, you know PMI teaches you to create a large project plan. Within that plan are many sub plans for each area of the project.

The PMI has come under scrutiny in recent years by the technology community, and for good reason. With the rapid advancement of technology and globalization, organizations need to be agile. Planning is important, but responding to change may be even more important. Our systems and organizations have become too complex for the PMI plan and control model. This need to adapt to change is what has fueled the Agile software development movement.

With the increase of self-organizing agile teams, it brings us back to the question, what is the role of the IT project manager? Is it an Agile project manager? Is it a project leader? Is it a servant leader? Is it a Scrum Master? Is it a tech lead?

The answer depends, but the role may consist of a combination of all these things. One thing we know for sure is that the IT project manager is a change agent and a leader.

To succeed in this role, one needs to have both hard and soft skills. Good IT project managers use both the left and right hemispheres of their brain. The right side of the brain used for cognitive thinking, the left side for emotional intelligence and relationships. This enables them to be both technical, and emotionally intelligent. Project management is both a science and an art form.

If you are looking to get into IT Project management, you better be able to deal with chaos while keeping your cool. If you currently work as an IT business analyst, tester, or developer, you are well prepped for IT project management. I began my career in QA, and my experience in testing has been invaluable to my role as an IT project manager.

The reason people in these roles make good IT project managers is because they are battle tested. They know what it’s like to be in the trenches of IT projects, and to come out on the other side.

Let’s face it, delivering IT projects is tough. Business executives often don’t realize how tough it is. They are like patrons in a restaurant ordering a four-course meal. As they sit in the dining hall waiting for their meal, agitated by any delay, they don’t see the chaos in the kitchen.

It’s the job of the IT project manager to manage the chaos while portraying calmness and confidence to the team and business. Managing the chaos and leading the project to completion is what makes the IT project manager so valuable.

For me, I enjoy the chaos that comes with delivering IT projects. I particularly like the areas of development and testing. If you love technology, working with others, and solving complex problems, the IT project manager role may be a great fit.

So although the identity of the IT project manager is hard to define, it’s an exciting time for the field. With the rapid advancement in technology and globalization, the demand for good IT project managers will continue to go up.

We have only begun to scratch the surface of the digital world. AI, IoT, and big data technologies are in their infancy. As we chart a course into unknown territories of the digital world, we need good IT project managers to lead the way!

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an IT Project and Program Manager as well as an Agile Scrum Master.

Follow Mike on Twitter @MikeMacIsaac or subscribe to Mike’s blog.

Managing projects in a global operating environment

managing projects

Project managers need to be culturally versed to work in the global economy. Being open to learning new cultures helps foster good relationships. One way to do this is by developing cultural intelligence (CQ). “Cultural intelligence refers to a person’s ability to use reasoning and observation skills to interpret unfamiliar gestures and situations and devise appropriate behavioral responses.” (Daft, 2011)

The three components that work together for CQ are cognitive, emotional, and physical. Cognitive refers to your ability to pick up on observations. Emotional refers to self-motivation. Physical is being able to shift your body language or way of expressing yourself to align with people for a different culture.

Having the opportunity to work or study abroad and get exposed to different cultures is a great way to develop CQ. Studies have found that people who adapt to global management best are those who have grown up learning how to understand, empathize, and work with others from different cultures.

As a project manager, I work with people from other countries outside the US. My teams use technology to communicate with coworkers in other countries. Video conferences and internet connection forums have introduced great methods for work collaboration.

Whether you are talking over the phone or in person, it is important to show interest in cultures outside of your own.  This helps to establish good relationships and increases communication and team effectiveness. Relationships are the key to global business. Whether you are from Ireland, Japan, or America, you have to treat people well. People deserve to be treated with respect and dignity.

By developing cultural intelligence, you can manage projects successfully on a global scale.

For more on global effects on project management, see my LinkedIn post here.

For more content like this, subscribe to the MacIsaac Consulting Blog.

To contact us about our services, click here.

References

Daft, Richard L. (1996). The Leadership Experience

Communicating as a project manager – Don’t sugar coat it!

businessman drawing a line from point A to point B (selective focus)

This morning I attended a PMI Minnesota chapter breakfast. The presenter, Gus Broman, spoke about the importance of communication in project management. Gus gave a good talk and as usual with PMI events, there was good discussion among the attendees.

Although it wasn’t a big focus of Gus’s talk, one point he mentioned was being direct. After he mentioned this, I dwelled on how important it has been for me as a project manager to be direct. The tendency for new project managers, and I’ve been guilty of this, is to not be direct.

We sugar coat it when problems arise, or we delay giving bad news. We do this for many reasons. We want to be nice. We don’t want to deliver bad news. We want people to like us, etc.

The problem is, the more you delay or sugar coat bad news, the more you hurt your project. None of us like delivering uncomfortable news, but we have an ethical obligation to be direct.

Project management is all about communication, and it’s important to be clear and concise. Good communication is about not leaving any room for misinterpretation. As a project manager, you need to manage down and up, and your communication needs to be crystal clear.

The longer I work as a project manager, the more clear it becomes to me that I have to be direct. Being direct and candid with your team members and leadership gets everyone on the same page.

So be professional and tactful, but be direct. Don’t worry about hurting feelings, they’ll get over it.

For more content like this, subscribe to the MacIsaac Consulting Blog.

To contact us about our services, click here.

 

 

 

The art of being an Agile project manager

Agile Project Manager

The Agile project manager role has become quite common. As more organizations adopt Agile, the traditional project manager role has morphed into a hybrid Scrum Master. For those of us working as Agile project managers, we have the challenge of blending two different, even opposing, roles into one. It begs us to question, can one even be an Agile project manager? Ken Schwaber seems to think so. The co-founder of Scrum wrote a book called “Agile project management with Scrum”.

Let’s back up and take a look at the differences between a Scrum Master and a project manager.

  • The Project Manager – If you have your PMP, you know that project management is all about planning, control, and communication. The traditional project manager role is big on command and control. The PM has authority over the team. The PM manages the team, assigns work, and is accountable for the success of the project. The PM is responsible to create a detailed Gantt chart project schedule and all planning happens at the start of the project.
  • The Scrum Master – If you have your CSM, you know that a Scrum Master is not a project manager. Whereas the project manager is about command and control, the Scrum Master is about servant leadership. The Scrum Master does not have authority over the team, he is more of a guide and coach. The Scrum Master shields the team from interference’s. He removes impediments, and ensures Scrum the team understands processes and values.

Knowing the differences between the two roles, we can now see how working as an “Agile Project Manager” is an art form.

Below are some tips to help you be an effective Agile project manager:

  1. Let go of the idea that Agile or traditional project management has to be one way, all or nothing. Organizations are complex and tackling a change like Agile adoption is difficult. This is especially true for large organizations used to rigid structure and control.
  2. Don’t be afraid to switch hats, between PM and Scrum Master, when necessary. For example, I try to empower the team and not tell people what to do (with my Scrum Master hat on). Yet, when the team starts running into trouble, I create a sense of urgency and give direction (putting my PM hat on).
  3. Help to educate the leadership team on the difference’s between Agile and Waterfall. The real value in Agile is in the core values, not the practices. In fact, most Agile projects that fail are a result of company culture not aligning with Agile core values.
  4. Make the Agile ceremonies mandatory. Agile teams may be self empowered, but you have to at least follow the key ceremonies. If you’re not having daily standups, sprint reviews and retrospectives, don’t call yourself Agile. These Agile practices are low hanging fruit. They are the easiest things for teams to adopt. The hard stuff is getting the core principles right.
  5. Perform the Agile PM role to the best of your ability, and do it with a smile. Whether you are an employee or a consultant, your job is to fulfill the need of the organization. Try to improve processes, but as Dale Carnegie says “don’t criticize, condemn, or complain”.

The art of being an Agile project manager means being flexible and willing to lead. It means accepting that some roles won’t always be by the book.  It means understanding the value in both the Scrum Master and PM roles, and finding a way to make them work together.

For more content like this, subscribe to the MacIsaac Consulting Blog.

To contact us about our services, click here.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Leading cause of failed Agile projects? Company culture not aligned with core Agile values

In the 2015 VersionOne state of Agile survey, the top reason for failed Agile projects (46% of respondents) was company culture being at odds with core Agile values.

fail_at_strategy

I’ve experienced this myself. Companies understand they need to get better at delivering software, so they decide to assemble Agile teams and bring in training.

The Agile teams use all the Agile practices, yet leadership sees little improvement. Why is there little improvement? Usually it’s because the company has a philosophy and culture that are at odds with core Agile values.

Below are the core values outlined in the Agile manifesto:

Individuals and interactions over processes and tools
Working software over comprehensive documentation
Customer collaboration over contract negotiation
Responding to change over following a plan

Organizations have to have the ability to adapt to change. The advance of technology and globalization have made this an absolute need to stay competitive.

Adopting Agile is not just about improving how a small project team delivers software. It’s bigger than that. Leadership has to get on board with Agile values and principles. Organizations of the future will be dynamic,  fluid, and need leadership at all levels. The days of a static hierarchy org structure will soon be long gone.

The question remains, what should leadership do to align the company culture with Agile core values? My advice is to not try and change the culture head on. Many have tried and failed. Instead, allow the Agile team(s) to adapt their own rules and culture. Think of them as an organization within an organization. Allow them exceptions to old buerecratic processes. Help them remove any impediments that’s slowing them down. Let them develop their own mini culture.

Once you do this and start seeing success, you can then begin to expand out the new culture. The idea is to start changing the company culture in small chunks, one area at a time.

For large organizations, changing company culture is a monumental challenge. You need leadership at the top to champion the change. You’ll need buy in and a sense of urgency.

Once Agile core values align with company culture, product delivery will go faster and changing priorities will be managed better.

For more content like this, subscribe to the MacIsaac Consulting Blog.

To contact us about our services, click here.

 

 

 

 

Agile is Value Driven, Not Plan Driven

Agile

How many times have we all experienced this? Leadership asks for project status. What they want is a color. Is the project green, yellow or red? If it’s green, all is well. If it’s yellow, there is cause for concern. If it’s red, sound the alarm!

And how do we justify whether a project is green, yellow or red? We check the project schedule, budget and scope. If one if these areas doesn’t align with the plan, the project is red.

If we were talking about waterfall projects, this wouldn’t be an issue. The problem is, many companies manage “Agile” projects in this same way. They want to be Agile, but fail to let go of a plan driven, project focused approach.

Agile is a value driven approach, not plan driven.

A plan driven, project focused, approach is what we learned when we got our PMP’s. Everything is planned up front. Requirements are fixed, and cost and schedule are estimated. We then report status based on how the project is doing compared to the plan.

When it comes to software development, we know a plan driven approach is flawed. Yet, many companies continue to use it. Why? Why do we punish project teams for being over budget or behind schedule when we know it’s the process that’s broken?

We need to shift our mindset from project focus, to product focus.

Product focus is a value driven, adaptive process. It doesn’t punish teams for change. It anticipates change and even welcomes it.

In a value driven approach, cost is fixed, and features are estimated. It’s the reverse of a plan driven approach. Investment is made at the product level, not a project level. People are dedicated to teams, and the teams stay intact.

This move from project focus to product focus is not pie in the sky. It’s not for small tech firms only. Target, for example, has completely shifted to a product focus model. They get it, and they’re not alone. Many large companies are organizing cross functional teams around products. They are bringing IT and business people together to focus on delivering business outcomes.

If your company is going Agile, ask yourself, are you ready to move on from traditional project management? Are you ready to no longer have a PMO? Are you ready to change? If yes, then it’s time to embrace a product focused mindset. If no, then continue using Waterfall, but don’t call it Agile. 

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an Agile Delivery Consultant and IT Project/Program Manager. Follow Mike on Twitter@MikeMacIsaac or visit Mike’s blog.

The Truth About the Limitation of Scrum

limitation of scrum

There is something I’d like to get off my chest. There is this notion in Agile that project management is no longer needed. Some even think that the role of a project manager will soon be extinct. Before we chase away project managers with pitch forks, lets back up a bit. I’m 100% on board with Agile and with Scrum, but I disagree that the need for project management is going away. The reason is that Scrum has a limitation. It is not designed to deliver large scale projects, at least not without help. The complexities of large scale projects demand the need for project management. This may change at some point, but I don’t see it happening any time soon. And, I’m not sure it should.

I can envision the Agile purists as they read this. Project managers needed in Agile? Scrum has limitations? Blasphemy! Hear me out.

When I refer to large scale projects, I mean projects that could have anywhere between 5-30 changed systems. These types of projects usually include complex system dependencies and a lot of coordination. The systems need to integrate and plan their production releases based on their dependencies. Someone needs to oversee that it comes together, and that someone is a project manager.

On Scrum teams, no, there is no need for a project manager. There are only three defined team roles in Scrum. They are Product Owner, Scrum Master, and the Development Team. Scrum is perfect for teams that focus only on one product or component. As an example, a Scrum team may focus on the search feature of a website.

The need for a project manager shows itself when you have large-scale initiatives. When you have a large project that impacts many Scrum teams, someone must coordinate all the dependencies between the teams. Without a project manager, who will do this? I posed this question in a recent advanced Scrum training course. I then proceeded to watch the instructor twist into a pretzel struggling to answer it. I was then referred to a course offered on Scrum@Scale.

Scrum@Scale, along with LeSS, and SAFe are the popular scaled Agile frameworks. While each of these have their benefits, they also have limitations when it comes to large scale projects. The problem is not scaling more Scrum teams, although that poses a different set of challenges. The problem is managing large scale projects.

In a recent HBR article, Agile at Scale, Jeff Sutherland and other experts discussed large scale Agile projects. They said you can establish a “team of teams” (or Scrum of Scrums), and issues that can’t be resolved can be escalated up to leaders. I’m all for that, but it still doesn’t answer the question of who is coordinating the work of all the teams? They go on in the article to reference Saab’s aeronautics business. “Aeronautics also coordinates its teams through a common rhythm of three-week sprints, a project master plan that is treated as a living document”.

I found it interesting that they referenced a company that uses a project plan in an article on scaled Scrum. This further indicates to me that we need to pause on the idea of abandoning project management.

Scrum@Scale is the model Jeff Sutherland advocates for scaling. In Scrum@Scale, there is a Chief Product Owner (CPO) and a Scrum of Scrums Master (SoSM). They are like the team level Scrum Master or Product Owner roles, but at scale. These roles sound like they will help address the challenge of managing large-scale projects, but there is still a gap. While a SoSM focuses on removing impediments and the CPO on prioritization, you still need someone to look at the project from a holistic view. Someone must coordinate team dependencies, not to mention manage risk, schedule and budget. In short, you need a project manager.

The need for project managers on large scale Agile projects has fueled the rise of SAFe. If you’ve read my post on the problem with SAFe, you know that I’m not a huge fan. But, at least SAFe acknowledges that someone needs to coordinate the work of self-organizing teams on large scale projects. They refer to the role as a Release Train Engineer (RTE), but it sounds a lot like a project manager to me.

Why do Agilest cringe when they hear the words project manager, or for that matter, the word project? When I say there is a need for project management in Agile, I am not saying that projects need to move in sequence from phase to phase like waterfall. I’m not referring to a command and control tyrant who manages Gantt charts with an iron first. Project managers today can lead large initiatives and still follow Agile principles. Projects can still use an iterative experimental process.

You may argue that by creating an architecture where each Scrum team works on an autonomous application, you end the need for a project manager. Spotify is a good example. Lightweight autonomous applications are the way to go, but you still can’t get away from dependencies on large scale projects. In most large fortune 500 organizations, legacy applications are dependent on other systems.

In summary, Scrum has a limitation when it comes to large scale projects. Project managers are not needed on Scrum teams, but they are still needed in Agile for large scale projects. What is changing is not that the Project manager role is going away. It is the role itself that is changing to align with Agile values and principles. The Scrum organizations seem to be working hard to address this limitation through their scaled frameworks, but they have a long way to go.

If you have experienced large scale Agile projects where there was no need for a project manager, I would love to hear about it. I’ve worked for many organizations that have adopted Agile and I’ve yet to come across one that had no need for project management.

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an Agile Delivery Consultant and IT Project/Program Manager. Follow Mike on Twitter@MikeMacIsaac or subscribe to Mike’s blog.

Digital Disruption Has Exposed a Need For Soft Skills

empower teams

The PMI (Project Management Institute) released their 2018 Pulse of the Profession report. The report gives good insight into the current state of global project management.

What I found most interesting was the effect of disruption on project management. We are in the midst of digital disruption affecting almost all industries. A good part of manual work has already been replaced by automation. AI, Big Data, Data Intelligence, and Healthcare reforms are a few of the disruptive trends already affecting businesses.

Dr. Michael Chui, a partner at McKinsey Global Institute, said that knowledge of these disruptions is crucial for project managers. It’s important to “understand the art of the possible and try to stay at least abreast, if not ahead, of what these technologies can do.”

Project management is no longer only about managing scope, schedule and budget. Project managers need much more than technical skills. They must be able to lead strategic initiatives that drive change in organizations.

Dealing with digital disruption, leadership skills and business acumen are critical skills. Organizations would be well advised to invest in training to help their project managers build upon these skills. In PMI’s survey, 51% of respondents reported that soft skills are much more important today than they were just 5 years ago.

It’s ironic, the more digital the world becomes, the more the need for basic human skills increases. Emotional and social intelligence are critical assets for project managers. I recognized this growing need for soft skills in project management, years ago. The need goes beyond project management. In information technology, there is a drought of emotional intelligence.

Project managers must deliver more value than the functional aspects of project management. As a program and project management consultant, I strive to build relationships and provide leadership. I want to go beyond scope, schedule and cost, and I expect the same out the project managers I work with.

If your business is in need of project managers who have the soft skills needed to respond to disruption, reach out to us at MacIsaac Consulting. We are here to be of service.

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant for MacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an IT Project and Program Manager as well as an Agile Scrum Master. Follow Mike on Twitter@MikeMacIsaac or subscribe to Mike’s blog.

 

Have People Had Enough Of Agile?

Agile Delivery

Photo Credit Shutterstock

If you work in a business that has anything to do with technology, you are familiar with Agile. You know the Agile I’m talking about. The kind where teams sit together and deliver software in increments. Seems everywhere you turn these days you hear about Agile. Along with Agile’s popularity has come a title wave of services. These services include coaching, training and certifications.

Consultancies have jumped on the Agile bandwagon big time. The other day I noticed a local consulting firm completely re-branded themselves. They are now the Agile experts. I was like wait, what? Like a year ago, they didn’t even provide IT consulting. Anyway, you get the point, Agile is the flavor of the moment and it’s everywhere.

Along with the over promotion and saturation of Agile, there has also been a mass influx of Agile gurus. These gurus scour the internet to prove their Agile knowledge is second to none. Agile to them has become a religion. They are quick to scold anyone blasphemous enough to challenge their Agile expertise. If you follow any Agile groups on LinkedIn, you’ve seen the ridiculous feuds. For sure the gurus will comment on this post to teach me the error of my ways.  Dealing with these gurus online is bad, but if you’ve had to work with them, it’s even worse.

So, between the obnoxious gurus and the commodification, I must ask, have people had enough of Agile? Is Agile software delivery like the glam hair metal of the 80s, and we’re at the point of Nirvana and grunge breaking onto the scene?  Keep in mind that as I ask this question, I’m a pro Agile guy. For many years, I studied and worked in both the Agile and traditional SDLC worlds, and today Agile is my preference. Although I’m a pro Agile, I’m concerned about what Agile has become.

To back up a bit, I started my career back in 2000 as a manual software tester, long before Agile exploded onto the scene. For years, I tested software for various organizations. Around 2008, I got introduced to Agile when I worked as a QA analyst on Scrum team. After time, I started working as an IT Project Manager and an Agile Scrum Master.

I studied everything I could on project management and on Agile delivery. I got my PMP and in business school I studied systems thinking and the theory of constraints. I attended Agile training, got a CSM (Certified Scrum Master) certification, and read every book I could on Agile.

Today, I still consult as an IT project/program manager or Agile Scrum Master. Although my preference is Agile, I’ll perform whatever the client role requires. Usually this means being a traditional project manager, an Agile Scrum Master, or a hybrid of both.

I have a real appreciation for Agile delivery. I found that the Scrum Master role coincides with two of my other passions, leadership and emotional intelligence. I love how Agile delivery is not only about writing code, but also about relationships and working together as a team.

As much as I’m a fan of Agile, I still think there is value in traditional project management. There are disciplines and processes that are tried and true in project management. We need to be careful not to write them off. Not all organizations are ready for Agile adoption, and that’s okay. I know that may sound odd coming from someone who is pro Agile, but if we are honest, Agile adoption is not easy. It isn’t as simple as attending a training. There are some great training services available, but often they have little effect.

All this leads me back to question, have people had enough of Agile? Am I, and pro Agile people like myself, part of the problem? Have we lost sight of the Agile Manifesto and become too dogmatic in our views, turning others off?

Soon Agile will morph into something else. New delivery frameworks will emerge, and so will new gurus. Whatever happens, it’s important we open ourselves up to not having all the answers, and we remain teachable. The main goal is that we continue to improve how we develop software and work together. To me, the Agile movement is a part of something bigger than certifications and gurus. It’s about working together to build quality products that provide value. What say you?

About the Author: Mike MacIsaac is the owner and principal consultant forMacIsaac Consulting. Mike provides leadership as an IT Project and Program Manager as well as an Agile Scrum Master. You can follow Mike on Twitter@MikeMacIsaac or subscribe to Mike’s blog.

Page 2 of 5

Powered by WordPress & Theme by Anders Norén